Wine-Making Along the Brooklyn Waterfront

The BWRC hosted its second breakfast talk of the semester, “Making Wine on the Brooklyn Waterfront: Blending Community, Philanthropy and Education,” on Friday December 1st.

The event was led by hospitality management professor Karen Goodlad, who also directs the campus-wide Living Lab initiative. Professor Goodlad moderated a lively panel discussion that highlighted the challenges and opportunities for winemaking in the heart of the city. Goodlad’s expertise on food and beverage management helped catalyze the focus of the breakfast talk – an innovative college partnership that connects City Tech students with wine producers at the Red Hook Winery.

Joining the panel was Christopher Nicolson, a lead wine-maker at the Red Hook Winery. Nicolson educated the audience about the unique characteristics of Redhook Winery, namely its deep connections with local New York State farmers. Nicolson personally works with eight different small-scale grape producers on the North Fork of Long Island, as well as a host of other producers in the Finger Lakes region. The intimate connection between producer and winemakers allows the Redhook Winery to build a culture of camaraderie that is empowering a local production chain, anchored at the wine’s point of production in Red Hook.

Nicolson also briefed the group on the winery’s recent history, focusing on the effects of Hurricane Sandy. After the storm destroyed a significant portion of the winery’s stock, community efforts enabled the winery to bounce back and build a more resilient business model. The partnership between City Tech and the winery proved crucial to the winery’s ability to sustain itself in the months after the devastating storm.

Hospitality students and panelists, Polina Savchenko, Roberto Burbano, and Renald Castillo also shared lively insights from their first-hand work experience in the wine-making partnership program. Throughout their independent study program, the City Tech students gained critical first-hand knowledge about the wine making process and New York’s unique viticulture. The semester-long adventure culminated with the production of two special label “City Tech” wines that were bottled and distributed to City Tech for it’s campus dining services. Both “City Tech” varietals – a red and a white wine — are served throughout the year in the Hospitality Management Department’s Janet Lefler Dining Room. If you would like to learn more about New York’s growing wine industry or how you can get involved, be sure to visit Red Hook Winery.

November Breakfast Talk: Green Gentrification with Kenneth Gould and Tammy Lewis

 

 

On Friday, November 17th, BWRC hosted a Breakfast Talk featuring Kenneth A. Gould and Tammy L. Lewis who spoke about their book, Green Gentrification: Urban Sustainability and the Struggle for Environmental Justice. BWRC welcomed Gould and Lewis to a full house as they discussed their idea of “Green Gentrification.”

Gould and Lewis are professors of sociology at Brooklyn College and professors of sociology and earth and environmental sciences at the CUNY Graduate Center. Together, they took us through a geographical view of the Brooklyn waterfront and explained how Green Gentrification is affecting waterfront communities such as Red Hook and Sunset Park. They explained the importance of keeping communities sustainable by making an effort to keep neighborhoods affordable for the residents already living there.

The talk ended in a spirited question and answer period during which the speakers provided ways for communities to gain green infrastructure and still serve and retain current residents. BWRC was excited to orchestrate an event where people engaged in discussions about creating sustainable living conditions for New York residents. BWRC looks forward to continuing to serve as a catalyst for discussions about creating sustainable and environmentally benign living conditions throughout our communities.