Visions for Newtown Creek

BWRC hosted its first Breakfast Talk of the semester, “Visions for Newtown Creek,” on October 12th, 2018. Speakers representing the Newtown Creek Alliance and Riverkeeper outlined their comprehensive, community-driven Vision Plan for the remediation of Newtown Creek.

Lisa Bloodgood, Director of Advocacy and Education at the Newtown Creek Alliance and Chrissy Remein, the Community Project manager at Riverkeeper, presented this ambitious plan starting with a brief history of the challenges inherent to environmental restoration in a densely-populated urban industrial environment. Among the most pressing concerns for residents in the area is the chronic issue of combined sewage overflow (CSO), which occurs when sewer systems are overloaded with rainwater run-off, diverting a mixture of sewage and stormwater to the nearest water body–in this case, the Newtown Creek. Watch this video by the Center for Urban Pedagogy to learn more about CSO.

Although it was designated as a Superfund site by the EPA in 2010, the formal environmental remediation process in Newtown Creek has yet to begin. While the EPA continued its research and feasibility studies, community and environmental advocacy organizations formed the Superfund Community Advisory Group (CAG) with local residents, businesses, and environmental advocacy groups to develop a long-term planning strategy, culminating in the 85-part Vision Plan.

At the heart of the Vision Plan is a commitment to protect and support Newtown Creek as a site of industry and employment in the community. The various strategies outlined by the report intend to strike an appropriate balance of uses between recreation and industry by reimagining what these public spaces can achieve for future generations.

Brooklyn Waters: Annual Conference Recap

        BWRC hosted Brooklyn Waters, its seventh conference at Borough Hall on April 20th, 2018. Titled Brooklyn Waters, the conference focused on the complex, interconnected issues of sea level rise, sustainability, and resilience along Brooklyn’s waterfront. BWRC was thrilled to host a sold-out event, with over 185 urban planners, government leaders, community advocates, and scholars registered.

        The gathering kicked off with featured speakers who spoke about the Brooklyn waterfront’s history, climate science, and current urban planning initiatives. Julia Golia, Director of Public History at the Brooklyn Historical Society, outlined the history of Brooklyn’s working waterfront, providing much needed context on the development and transformation happening along the shoreline in Kings County. Cynthia Rosenzweig, Senior Research Scientist at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, provided pertinent information on the current climate science behind sea level rise affecting New York. Closing out the morning’s framing conversation was Michael Marrella, Director of Waterfront and Open Space Planning at the NYC Department of City Planning.

         The first full panel, moderated by City Tech professor Benjamin Shepard, explored civic, government, and design response to sea-level rise and storm surge. The first panel featured advocacy leaders, Caroline Nagy from the Center for NYC Neighborhoods and Kate Boicourt from the Waterfront Alliance. Tevina Willis, Local Leaders Facilitator with the Red Hook Initiative, walked the audience through grassroots resiliency efforts in Red Hook. Similarly, architect Eran Chen explained that his firm (ODA New York) prioritizes resiliency design efforts in more large-scale projects along the Brooklyn waterfront. Another waterfront powerhouse, the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation, joined the conversation; Executive Vice President Clare Newman explained that the Navy Yard’s resiliency plan promises continued sustainable growth alongside steady job creation.

         After lunch, conference participants got a closer look at Brooklyn’s ‘soft edges,’ with an emphasis on Brooklyn Bridge Park and Jamaica Bay. Moderated by City Tech professor Reginald Blake moderated the panel that offered critical perspectives on both natural and built ‘soft edges.’ Executive Vice President of Brooklyn Bridge Park, David Lowin, explored the ways that a recreational edge environment prepares its infrastructure for rising tides and storm surge. Next, leaders from advocacy, research, and government organizations shared critical views on the role that Jamaica Bay plays in maintaining Brooklyn’s resilient edges. Adam Parris, Executive Director of the Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay, was joined by John McLaughlin, from NYC DEP’s Office of Ecosystem Services, Green Infrastructure, and Research. To close out the session, Lauren Cosgrove of National Parks Conservation Association discussed the vitality and critical ecological role played by Gateway National Recreation Area.

        In the final session of the conference, Roland Lewis, President of the Waterfront Alliance, moderated a round table discussion on the future of resilience efforts in New York and beyond. Council Member Carlos Menchaca joined the panel, imploring the audience to integrate political activism into all resiliency efforts. Alongside Menchaca were panelists Sam Hersh, of Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency and City Tech professors, Reginald Blake and Illya Azaroff.

         The day’s discussion and debate closed with a few words from BWRC Director, Richard Hanley, who gave a sneak peak of the 2019 conference topic: the contested issue of housing along Brooklyn’s waterfront. BWRC is thankful to all the panelists and moderators who joined us for an action-oriented day. Finally, many thanks to Robin Michals for so generously photographing the conference.

 

 

Wine-Making Along the Brooklyn Waterfront

The BWRC hosted its second breakfast talk of the semester, “Making Wine on the Brooklyn Waterfront: Blending Community, Philanthropy and Education,” on Friday December 1st.

The event was led by hospitality management professor Karen Goodlad, who also directs the campus-wide Living Lab initiative. Professor Goodlad moderated a lively panel discussion that highlighted the challenges and opportunities for winemaking in the heart of the city. Goodlad’s expertise on food and beverage management helped catalyze the focus of the breakfast talk – an innovative college partnership that connects City Tech students with wine producers at the Red Hook Winery.

Joining the panel was Christopher Nicolson, a lead wine-maker at the Red Hook Winery. Nicolson educated the audience about the unique characteristics of Redhook Winery, namely its deep connections with local New York State farmers. Nicolson personally works with eight different small-scale grape producers on the North Fork of Long Island, as well as a host of other producers in the Finger Lakes region. The intimate connection between producer and winemakers allows the Redhook Winery to build a culture of camaraderie that is empowering a local production chain, anchored at the wine’s point of production in Red Hook.

Nicolson also briefed the group on the winery’s recent history, focusing on the effects of Hurricane Sandy. After the storm destroyed a significant portion of the winery’s stock, community efforts enabled the winery to bounce back and build a more resilient business model. The partnership between City Tech and the winery proved crucial to the winery’s ability to sustain itself in the months after the devastating storm.

Hospitality students and panelists, Polina Savchenko, Roberto Burbano, and Renald Castillo also shared lively insights from their first-hand work experience in the wine-making partnership program. Throughout their independent study program, the City Tech students gained critical first-hand knowledge about the wine making process and New York’s unique viticulture. The semester-long adventure culminated with the production of two special label “City Tech” wines that were bottled and distributed to City Tech for it’s campus dining services. Both “City Tech” varietals – a red and a white wine — are served throughout the year in the Hospitality Management Department’s Janet Lefler Dining Room. If you would like to learn more about New York’s growing wine industry or how you can get involved, be sure to visit Red Hook Winery.

November Breakfast Talk: Green Gentrification with Kenneth Gould and Tammy Lewis

 

 

On Friday, November 17th, BWRC hosted a Breakfast Talk featuring Kenneth A. Gould and Tammy L. Lewis who spoke about their book, Green Gentrification: Urban Sustainability and the Struggle for Environmental Justice. BWRC welcomed Gould and Lewis to a full house as they discussed their idea of “Green Gentrification.”

Gould and Lewis are professors of sociology at Brooklyn College and professors of sociology and earth and environmental sciences at the CUNY Graduate Center. Together, they took us through a geographical view of the Brooklyn waterfront and explained how Green Gentrification is affecting waterfront communities such as Red Hook and Sunset Park. They explained the importance of keeping communities sustainable by making an effort to keep neighborhoods affordable for the residents already living there.

The talk ended in a spirited question and answer period during which the speakers provided ways for communities to gain green infrastructure and still serve and retain current residents. BWRC was excited to orchestrate an event where people engaged in discussions about creating sustainable living conditions for New York residents. BWRC looks forward to continuing to serve as a catalyst for discussions about creating sustainable and environmentally benign living conditions throughout our communities.

February Breakfast Talk: “Shooting” the Brooklyn Waterfront – Two Photographers Talk About Their Work

BWRC presented our first Breakfast Talk of 2017 with photographers Robin Michals and Nathan Kensinger. Robin is an associate professor in the Communications Design department at CityTech while Nathan is a filmmaker and curator who writes for CurbedNY. Both started shooting the New York waterfront in 2007, when residential development was rapidly replacing remnants of the industrial past. Robin’s initial interest in the city’s shoreline was sparked by concerns over sea-level rise. Her first collection of photographs, called Castles Made of Sand documented places that would one day be underwater. Nathan, a native of San Francisco, moved to Brooklyn in 2003, and began photographing the disappearing working waterfront. Both photographers have been exhibited widely in New York City, with shows in Brooklyn libraries, galleries and museums. Six of Nathan’s images of industrial Brooklyn are currently on view in the Atlantic Avenue-Barclays station.

In recent years Robin’s focus has shifted to development on the Brooklyn waterfront, while Nathan’s current work reflects a burgeoning interest in climate change. Each photographer gave a short presentation, with selected images from the last 10 years, and an explanation of what drew them to the waterfront. The overarching narrative was of waterfront regeneration, as Robin and Nathan chronicled transformative changes to Brooklyn’s formerly industrial shoreline. Images of the former Domino Sugar Factory, the old Greenpoint Terminal Market, and Todd Shipyard (where Ikea sits now) drew great interest from the audience. Robin and Nathan explained how their work has come full circle, since they began chronicling the Brooklyn waterfront. Robin’s recent work has focused on real estate development, whereas Nathan is examining the effects of climate change. The presentations were followed by a lively discussion about Brooklyn Bridge Park and current models for waterfront revitalization.  

To view and learn about Robin’s work, please visit: http://www.e-arcades.com/

Nathan’s work may be found at http://nathankensinger.com and http://ny.curbed.com/camera-obscura

Upcoming BWRC Conference Will Focus on Manufacturing on the Brooklyn Waterfront

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Navy Yard Building 128 during its midcentury industrial heyday. Photo courtesy of National Archives.

For almost twenty years, the Brooklyn waterfront has been experiencing a renaissance propelled mainly by residential development. However, there have also been some manufacturing rebounds, or at least stabilization. The history of manufacturing losses in Brooklyn stretches back to the mid-1950s. The declines continued into this century when, from 2000 to 2010, Brooklyn lost 55 percent (23,925) of its remaining manufacturing jobs. But since the current decade began, the decline has stabilized, and Brooklyn is no longer seeing decreases in manufacturing employment. Also, there has been a new vibrancy at manufacturing locations along the Brooklyn waterfront’s industrial corridor at places such as, the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center, the Brooklyn Navy Yard, Industry City, Liberty View Industrial Plaza, and the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

BWRC’s Fifth Annual Conference, “The Past, Present, and Possible Future of Manufacturing Along the Brooklyn Waterfront,” will examine whether these recent developments can lead to the growth of a new kind of manufacturing that will be sustainable, or whether they are just a slight interruption in an inexorable march toward residential development and service sector employment along the Brooklyn waterfront. Featured speakers will include Deputy Borough President Diana Reyna, Miquela Craytor of the NYC Economic Development Corporation, and Adam Friedman of the Pratt Center for Community Development.

“The Past, Present, and Possible Future of Manufacturing” conference will take place at Brooklyn Borough Hall on April 8th, 2016, from 8:30am–12:30pm. The event is free and open to the public; you can RSVP for the event here.

Brooklyn’s Urban Farms: Production and Education. Breakfast Talk on Friday, Feb. 19th

Although the current urban farming movement predates its arrival in Brooklyn, some of the most innovative and dynamic urban farming is being done in that borough. While urban farms address issues of sustainability, nutrition, and “food deserts,” they have always had an educational component to them.

BWRC’s first breakfast event of the new semester will be a panel discussion on urban farms along the Brooklyn waterfront. The panelists will include urban farmers and educators: Ben Flanner of the Brooklyn Grange, Mara Gittleman of KCC Urban Farm, and Mark Hellerman and Diana Mincyte of City Tech.

The event is Free and Open to the Public. However, reservations are strongly encouraged.

RSVP Here

When:
February 19th 2016 – 8:30am

Where:
New York City College of Technology
Atrium 632
300 Jay St, Brooklyn NY

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The New Coney Island: Who gains, who loses? Breakfast Talk on Nov. 13th

November 13th, 8:30am at the New York City College of Technology, come hear Neil DeMause speak about how Coney Island has been changing.

Coney Island is in the midst of one of the biggest overhauls in its century-plus history: a redevelopment plan that’s involved over a decade of battles between city officials, amusement operators, developers, local residents, and, at times, protesters wielding amputated mermaid tails. This has been a transformation where much has been gained and lost. What is the future of America’s Playground? And whose vision of that future shapes public policy?

DeMause is a contributing editor for City Limits magazine, a frequent contributor to the Village Voice, and a former op-ed columnist for Metro New York. He is co-author of “Field of Schemes: How the Great Stadium Swindle Turns Public Money Into Private Profit” (University of Nebraska, 2008) and is currently at work on “The Brooklyn Wars,” scheduled for publication in early 2016. You can find him on Twitter @neildemause.

The event is Free and Open to the Public. However, Reservation strongly encouraged.

RSVP Here

When:
November 13th, 2015 – 8:30am

Where:
New York City College of Technology
Namm Building, Room 119
300 Jay St, Brooklyn NY

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Historian David Herlihy Speaks on Bikes and Coney Island

The historian, David Herlihy, came to the Brooklyn Waterfront Research Center on October 8. 2015 to present his recent research on the biking craze that hit Coney Island in the 1880s and lasted into the 1930s.  His presentation touched upon the first organized bike ride to Coney Island and the building of America’s first bicycle path which was built along Ocean Parkway and led to Coney Island.  He also recounted the exploits of racers in Coney Island’s velodromes and the Boardwalk act of “Bikers in a Basket.”

For his presentation, Mr. Herlihy was presented with a framed photograph of the Coney Island Boardwalk at dawn, shot by the BWRC staff photographer, Professor Robin Michals.

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Riding and Racing: Bikes at Coney Island (1880-1930)

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Courtesy of the Pryor Dodge Collection

Cycling along the Boardwalk at Coney Island is not new. In the 1880s, Coney Island was a frequent destination for club-oriented, high-wheel riders from New York City. During the great bicycle boom of the 1890s, Coney Island hosted numerous amateur and professional races. A velodrome (a type of bicycle race track) continued to flourish there into the 1930s. At about that time, adult recreational cycling enjoyed a major comeback, and Coney Island once again became a haven for recreational cyclists. Come learn about this fantastic period in Brooklyn history!
Come learn about this fantastic period in Brooklyn history!

RSVP here. Free!

Friday, October 9, 2015. 8:30am
New York City College of Technology
300 Jay St – Namm 119

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